How to Choose a The Right Champagne For Your Teeth

New Year’s Eve means two things: a midnight kiss and a tasty flute of bubbly-sweet champagne. Every year, champagne is almost required to usher in a new year. But why? Well, in this blog, we will be discussing a bit about the history of champagne at New Year’s and why it can spell trouble for your teeth. We hope, by reading this blog, you will be able to determine the sugar content of sparkling wines, as well as champagnes. By being able to know how sugary a drink can be, you will be able to protect your teeth from a massive sugar overload!

The History of Champagne

The tradition is likely to have originated with royal beginnings. It is said that some 1,500 years ago, King Clovis was baptized in a French region called Reims, also known as Champagne. When the king was baptized, the area became famous and a regal location. Because the area became such a recognizable location to celebrate regal baptismals, the entire region was filled with feasts and the country’s most delicious wines.
Champagne, the location, was known as the major wine region of France. In the 1600’s, a monk named Dom Perignon perfected sparkling wine and created what we today would recognize as champagne. Though Perignon cannot be technically crowned as the inventor of champagne, he was able to perfect it, develop new storage methods, and expanded the wine fields of Champagne, France. Perignon’s major contribution to the beverage was that he used corks to trap in the carbonation of the drink. Because he found a way to hold in the pressure of the bottles, the champagne could be stored and even shipped around the globe. Champagne didn’t get its real global recognition, however, until King Louis XV created laws governing the name of the drink and how the drink could be sold. For example, the drink was dubbed “Champagne” by the king and could only be considered “real champagne” if it was crafted in the fields of Champagne, France. Because the drink was rare, common amongst extravagant royalty, and expensive, most royalty and nobility around the world wanted Champagne shipped to them.

Champagne at Celebrations

Since champagne was drunk at royal coronations, weddings, baptisms, and other celebrations, the beverage became synonymous with jubilations. Even during the political turmoil of the French Revolution, any time treaties or important decisions were made in the government, champagne was poured out to celebrate.
It is only natural that champagne would be synonymous with celebrations, as it was primarily drunk by nobility around the world during important events.

Why Do We Drink Champagne for New Year’s Eve?

Champagne in America is a sort of trickle-down effect. Since the drink was so popular around the world, it didn’t take long before the American nobility wanted to follow in European footsteps. As New Year’s Eve was a time to celebrate the beginning of a new year, it naturally invited the consumption of a certain bubbly drink. However, during the Prohibition era, champagne consumption was a lot more difficult. Despite the crack-down on liquor and its distributors, an incredible 70 million bottles of champagne were shuttled into the United States between 1920 and 1933.

Is Champagne Sugary?

Yes! There are nearly 15 grams of sugar in each liter of a champagne bottle. Of course, this isn’t as much as your traditional can of Coca-Cola, but still, this amount of sugar could be a lot to place on your teeth. Though it is good to indulge a little, especially during a celebration such as New Year’s, it is important to be mindful about what you are eating and drinking. For one, it is important to remember that though champagne is a lighter drink, there is still 12.2 percent alcohol in each bottle. Not to mention, that each bottle has approximately 570 calories in a single bottle of champagne. So, if you don’t take our word that champagne can be bad for your teeth, at least you will know it is bad for your waistline!

Champagne and Your Teeth

Your teeth are strong and delicate at the same time. Though they can cut and bite through your food, their defenses are weak. Your teeth have natural enamel that serves as your teeths’ protector against dental decay and other dental diseases. When you drink highly acidic and sugar-rich substances, you can over time, wear away the enamel coating. This coating, once gone, cannot be re-made. There are ways to help protect your enamel, such as fluoride coatings from your dentist, brushing your teeth, and of course, regulating your diet. If you continue to drink and eat sugary items, your teeth can have a difficult time maintaining its natural enamel.

How to improve your teeth’s protection?

One way you can most certainly help your teeth this New Year’s Eve is by choosing less sugary wines. By doing so, you can give both your teeth and your waistline a break.
90 percent of all champagnes are dosed with brut. By checking the label of your champagne bottle, you will be able to determine which type of brut your bottle has been added with. This step is important because you will be able to tell which champagnes are higher in quality and which have more sugar based on the genre of brut.

Champagne and Your Teeth

Your teeth are strong and delicate at the same time. Though they can cut and bite through your food, their defenses are weak. Your teeth have natural enamel that serves as your teeths’ protector against dental decay and other dental diseases. When you drink highly acidic and sugar-rich substances, you can over time, wear away the enamel coating. This coating, once gone, cannot be re-made. There are ways to help protect your enamel, such as fluoride coatings from your dentist, brushing your teeth, and of course, regulating your diet. If you continue to drink and eat sugary items, your teeth can have a difficult time maintaining its natural enamel.

How to improve your teeth’s protection?

One way you can most certainly help your teeth this New Year’s Eve is by choosing less sugary wines. By doing so, you can give both your teeth and your waistline a break.
90 percent of all champagnes are dosed with brut. By checking the label of your champagne bottle, you will be able to determine which type of brut your bottle has been added with. This step is important because you will be able to tell which champagnes are higher in quality and which have more sugar based on the genre of brut.

There are five types of brut that can be added:

  • Brut Nature
  • Extra Brut
  • Brut
  • Extra Dry
  • Demi-Sec

If you look on the label of your champagne bottle and see that “brut nature” has been added to your bottle, this means this is the less sugary style of champagne. On the other hand, if you see that your bottle is added with “demi-sec,” this is by far the most sugary additive. Much of the reason sugar is added to champagne and various sparkling wines is to balance the acidity of the grapes in the drink. What is advantageous about champagne is that it takes very little sugar to sweeten the drink, compared to other common American beverages.

Why Does this Matter?

Choosing a less sugary wine or champagne can help you significantly reduce the amount of sugar you are drinking. And, in the world of dentistry, less sugar means healthier teeth! By being able to identify the higher quality sparkling wines and champagne bottles, you will be able to not only determine which bottle to drink, but which bottle is better for you.

Joshua Colkmire DDS

At Joshua Colkmire, we believe that you can still celebrate the holidays but in a healthy way for your teeth. As stated, your teeth’s enamel isn’t infinite, which is all the more reason to care for your teeth.

If you are interested in scheduling a dentist appointment, contact us today.